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Posted by on Mar 28, 2017 in All Matters SEO |

Digital Marketing Glossary

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With the digital marketing and search landscapes constantly changing, even the most digital savvy of us can get lost in the shuffle. Google is constantly updating algorithms and releasing new features, so it can start to feel like a full-time job to keep up. Luckily, that IS our full-time job at Digital Services by Marriott. We’ve compiled a list of our top search and digital marketing terms to get you up to speed. No promises that this entire list won’t change in the next couple of months though!

SERP– Search engine results page (SERP). This is the page that search engines show in response to a query by a searcher. This page will look different depending on the search engine (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.) but the main component is the list of websites or blue links that provide answers to the query.

SEO– Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of getting traffic from the free, organic or natural search results on search engines. Primary search results are listed on the search engine results page based on what the search engine considers most relevant to users.

Keyword– A word or phrase that describes the contents of a web page. Keywords help search engines match a page with an appropriate search query.

Local Search– A search to find something within a specific geographic area, such as “downtown hotel DC.” Local search results can appear in many different places on a SERP, but are typically accompanied by map pins. These results show the address and phone number of the company with a link to directions, if appropriate. Sometimes these listings are grouped into a “local pack.”

Local 3-pack– The top three results Google determines most geographically relevant to a local search. These three results will show at the top of the SERP in a special list accompanied by a map. Search terms that contain a geographic reference (“near me”) or services typically fulfilled by a local business like a hotel or bakery.Google SERP

(Image Source: Sang Froid Web)

Local Citation– Anywhere online that a business is mentioned by name. Business directories like Yell, Foursquare or Yelp are made of local citations. Being listed correctly on these sites is an important ranking factor for local search. They provide search engines with credible information about your business so the search engine understands the business exists, is legitimate and what you say about your business is true and accurate.

Incognito search– a setting that prevents the user’s browsing history and web cache from being used during a search. Since search engines take a user’s location and browsing history into account to deliver results, incognito search is a good way to search from a “blank slate.”

Incognito Search

(Image Source: Mary Cline)

Knowledge graph/panel– A system that Google launched to understand facts about people, places and things and how these entities are all connected. A knowledge graph displays on the SERP and is intended to provide answers, not just links to search queries so that users do not have to navigate to other sites to gather the information.

Knowledge graph

(Image Source, Mary Cline)

Google+– An interest-based social network that is owned and operated by Google. The platform was redesigned in November 2015, and currently focuses on Communities and Collections. Marriott owns all hotel Google+ listings under a bulk feed, and grants management access to stakeholders as needed. Please reach out to your MDS Client Services Manager for questions about your hotel’s Google+ listing.

Google My Business– a free tool for businesses and organizations to manage their online presence across Google, including Search and Maps. By verifying and editing business information, the owner can help customers find their business or any relevant information about it.

UNAPURL (address of a world-wide web page), name of hotel, address and phone number (UNAP). This is an important ranking factor for search engine optimization.

OTA– Online travel agency (OTA) that allows users to book hotel rooms, flights, train tickets, etc. These sites may be focused on travel reviews, trip fares or both. Examples include Expedia and Booking.com.

API– Application program interface (API). A set of routines, protocols and tolls for building software applications. APIs specify how software components should interact.

CTA– A call to action (CTA) is a type of online content that drives the user to click-through to engage with a brand. This can be an image, button, link, etc. that encourages someone to book, download, register, call or act in any way.

PPC– Pay-per-click (PPC) is a model of internet marketing where advertisers pay a fee each time one of their ads is clicked. Search engine advertising is one of the most common forms of PPC. Advertisers bid for ad placement in a search engine’s sponsored links when a user searches a keyword related to the business offering.

HTML– Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is a computer language that is used to create websites. HyperText is the method by which you move around on the web by clicking on special text called hyperlinks which take the user to the next page. Hyper means it is not linear, so it is possible to go to any place on the internet and there is no set order. HTML is a language with a set of code-words and syntax just like other languages.

Alt Tag– An alt tag describes what is in an image on a website and its function on the page. Screen readers for the blind and visually impaired read out this text to make an image accessible. Alt tags and title tags strengthen the message towards search engine spiders to improve the visibility of the site within search engines. The alt and title attributes of an images are commonly referred to as alt tag or alt text and title tag.

UX– User Experience (UX), or a customer’s experience when interacting with a product (i.e. website). User experience design is the process of enhancing user satisfaction and loyalty by improving the ease of use and pleasure provided in the interaction between the customer and the product. The concept most commonly applies to digital fields today.

Rich snippets– Describes structured data markup that operators can add to existing HTML so that search engines can better understand the information that is contained on each web page. Major search engines use this markup to present richer search results, allowing users to more easily find the information they are looking for. In the example blow, the search result shows a star rating, the number of votes, the price and the platform supported because Rich snippets were employed.

Rich snippets

(Image Source: Positionly)

Title Tag– A title tag is an HTML element that specifies the title of a web page and concisely describes the page’s content. Title tags are displayed as the clickable headlines on the search engine results page and are important for usability, SEO and social sharing. In addition to the SERP, they also appear in web browsers and social networks.

Title Tag

(Image Source: Mary Cline)

Description Tag– A piece of HTML code that provides a short description of a web page and is included in the code, but is not visible on the page itself. If a web page has a description tag, Google shows it if there is semantic similarity between the description tag and the content of the web page, and there is similarity between the user’s search query and the content of the description tag. If a page does not have a description tag, Google typically shows sentence fragments on the page that contain the search query.